With a fresh blanket of snow covering New England, there couldn’t be a better time to dream about everyone’s favorite warm weather treat, ice cream. Or, from the perspective of Victoria Young, as told to Edible Rhody, “Only in New England could you sell ice cream in the winter.” One might say Young, part of a rapidly growing movement of culinary purveyors taking the Rhode Island capital by storm, knows her way around a commercial kitchen. With a heavy-hitting resume, including time spent in the company of some of the world’s most renowned chefs (Redzepi, Boulud, need we say more?), Young has her sight set on elevating the profile of the creamy indulgence, one unique flavor at a time.

Scooping since Summer 2018, Fountain & Co., (Providence’s first craft ice cream maker), fully embraces the bounty of the Ocean State. A Johnson & Wales pastry alum, Young is drawn to the local RI community of growers and makers, using only the freshest ingredients in designing her flavors. And because ice cream is always more fun when there’s a party, Young has partnered with fellow Providence purveyors for a hitlist of brand collaborations (‘mashups’ for those of a more youthful generation). Need a little pep in your summer step? Cue Bourbon Butterscotch Coffee Stout, a flavor intense with Nitro Cart’s amazing brew. Ice cream sandwiches more your thing? Insert a PVDonut hugging your creamy scoop. Sundaes? Young’s got those too. Burgundian Liège Waffles are the perfect host for any combo of ice cream and toppings.

Craving a scoop to call your own? Young is currently popping up all over Providence, most frequently filling cups and cones out of a small window in partnership with Stock Culinary Goods. If the winter weather has you down, Young’s Pint of the Month is a no-brainer. Limited edition flavors in pint-sized containers, for all you late-night sneaky spooners.

Images courtesy of Fountain & Co. 

WARP & WEFT | ALEXANDRA KOHL

February 22, 2019

It was a few years ago at Field & Supply that we first came across the work of New York-based Fiber Artist Alexandra Kohl. Kohl, an avid equestrian, combines the beauty of cotton with horsehair via a delicate dance of warp and weft. The result – hand-woven textiles which not only unite the natural qualities of plant and animal, but also emanate an intricacy that discreetly draws the viewer in for closer admiration. For anyone unfamiliar with the age-old craft of hand-weaving, it is a process equally laborious and tranquil; each individual yarn manipulated by the weaver in a deliberate act as intricate as those of an experienced surgeon. Kohl’s masterful hand and eye for color marry flawlessly to preserve the longstanding tradition of hand-weaving.

In her most recent body of work, a joint venture with furniture designer J.M. Szymanski, bespoke furnishings juxtapose Kohl’s soft substrates against the stature of cast iron. Named an emerging talent by Architectural Digest in 2017, Kohl’s admiration for minimalism and organic architecture lends inspiration and is distinctly embodied in her textiles. What makes Kohl’s work even more desirable? A unique versatility to complement a wide range of aesthetic preferences, modern to traditional.

Images courtesy of Alexandra Kohl.

COASTAL ATTIRE

February 1, 2019

When we first laid eyes on this 2018 spread from Harper’s Bazaar, it was an unquestionable bookmark. Photographed by Paul Bellaart and featuring Dutch beauty Bette Franke, the oceanic backdrop calls for nothing more than timeless, coastal attire. At a time when it feels the entire nation is purging closets in anxious pursuit of anything and everything ‘sparking joy’, we remain steadfast in our belief that successful style is best embodied in a few simple basics. It’s true what they say, we’ve never met a stripe we didn’t like, and call us old-fashioned, but we’ve been collecting vintage fisherman knits for years. Layered with the refinement of classic tailoring, the simplicity of an elongated silhouette and a healthy glow that radiates from the inside out, it’s a win-win no matter if you’re dressing for the seaside or countryside. If you’re one of the cult-Kondo followers looking to make some drastic revisions within your own wardrobe, check out a few of our favorite of-the-moment options.

Breton Stripes

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Classic Tailoring

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Elongated Silhouettes

1 | 2 | 3 | | 5

Fisherman Knits

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Sunkissed Glow

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

 

Harper’s Bazaar España, October 2018 | Images by Paul Bellaart.

2019 | STARTING FRESH

January 25, 2019

 

It’s been awhile since you’ve found us Around the Pound, but we’re back. And starting fresh. If you’re still checking in, craving something new and inspiring, we appreciate you staying the course. If you left for a bit (we don’t blame you) and found your way back, we’re delighted about that too. Occasionally life gets busy, (and complicated), and while one might think hitting the pause button on ‘tasks’ like posting creates mental space to deal with the ‘chaos’, it’s soon realized the very things that once seemed frivolous are actually what keep us inspired and grounded.

A recent trip across the Atlantic found us standing on the shore of Le Bois de Cise, staring into a muted grey skyline spanning from France across the English Channel. Complete with a coastal trifecta of whipping wind, stinging seaspray, and crashing waves, one might go so far as deem the conditions horrid. And yet, it was remarkably calming. Cathartic, actually. There’s a quote we posted, ‘The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea‘. Sometimes it takes crossing an ocean to find the source, not just for one, but all three. A desolate beach, accompanied by a few boisterous gulls and a backdrop of Jurassic proportions, triggered a deeply emotional reminder that we so easily and often forget – Mother Nature’s grandeur puts everything else in perspective.

Photo by The Gilded Lobster.

TICKET TO DELICIOUS | THE GREY

December 30, 2017

 

As the end of 2017 draws near, we find it only fitting to close the year with a feast for the eyes and the belly. It’s been a wholesome year at TGL, abundant with travel to cities at home and countries abroad, memorable meal after memorable meal, and a healthy dose of Vitamin Sea thanks to repose-on-repeat in our City-by-the-Sea.

During our last #gildedgetaway of 2017, (a pre-holiday escape to Savannah), we marched our hungry selves straight to The Grey, a hub, not only for bustling waitstaff serving plates of Southern hospitality, but also a symbol for an era reincarnate. The Grey is brain-child of Savannah-ite by way of New York John Morisano, whose vision for a 1938 Greyhound Bus Terminal broke all boundaries when it transcended expectations of experiential modern day dining. Gastronomically paired with the talent of Chef Mashama Bailey, Morisano unequivocally describes the concept for The Grey as, “Delicious“.

The partners looked to NYC-based Parts and Labor Design to assume the monumental task of breathing new life into the old terminal on one of the Port City’s main arteries, a project which earned them James Beard accolades for Restaurant Design in 2015. Preserving as many original details from the terminal as possible, Parts and Labor seamlessly transport diners back to 1938 via a contemporary lens – the once ticket window now a voyeuristic view into Bailey’s open kitchen, the second-floor shower room a private dining retreat, the street front diner a casual bar with a daytime-esque menu. The shining star still twinkling in our eyes? Lighting. You read that right, lighting, every way you turn. Custom lighting so fitting to the era when we asked Morisano during our evening meal which pieces were original, we learned only several industrial pendants suspended high into the skylight, and our hands-down favorite, a petite brass and glass flush-mount en route to the first floor loo, were once seen by riders destined to other locations.

Last, but certainly not least, what restaurant in today’s world of discerning diners doesn’t deserve a top-notch identity, menu suite and collectible matches at the host stand? Cue LMNOP Creative, marrying Art Deco inspiration with sophisticated signage, illustration and typography to create ephemera worthy of more time in the limelight. Credit worthy paper goods are some of our favorite souvenirs, this visit replete with postcards, coasters, and naturally, one or two of the aforementioned matchbooks.

In the spirit of holiday giving, there’s more; we went back to The Grey less than 24 hours after our first meal, drawn to the small-but-mighty diner bar with windows as wide as they are tall (think Hopper in Savannah), yielding a one-way ticket to a different menu with classics like Pastrami on Rye or the Schnitzel Sandwich. Hence, if frequency to an establishment elicits further coaxing, we reckon you buy yourself a seat at this new/old Savannah landmark and partake of said ‘Deliciousness‘.

Images courtesy of Parts and Labor Design and LMNOP Creative.

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