Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

DETROIT

November 9, 2019

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We know, we promised 2019 would be a pointed return to better blogging. If you’re here as a loyal reader, fingers crossed you’ve already forgiven us. Ended up here on a whim? We’re so glad you found us. With a trip to Michigan already on the books, we declared it perfect timing to tack on a few days in the Motor City and faithfully return to our Gilded Getaway roots. Having been to the city in recent years for a special project, one might say we were pre-exposed; we had a heightened sense of what to anticipate and where to explore. It’s true what the papers say, Detroit is a city in transition, i.e. ‘under construction’ – the sights and sounds of revitalization and a return to glory on the horizon, but very much a work-in-progress. Thanks in part to an alliance of local developers and larger corporations, downtown has successfully seen the restoration of landmark buildings, complemented by cutting-edge cuisine, American-made manufacturing and good ‘ole red, white & blue homegrown spirit.

While a stay at the new Shinola Hotel was truly the catalyst of our travel journey, the guide is chock full of good eats mixed with a splash of inspiration. Recently named Best New Large Hotel by Surface Magazine, the 1400 Woodward hotel designed by Gachot Studios is simply stunning, worthy of every accolade already received and all the future news that’s fit to print. The site is storied with Motor City history, an amalgamation of five historic buildings and a tucked away alley paying homage to one of the city’s first black landowners. For those looking to stay local, the Detroit-based Shinola team provided everything at arm’s length for the discerning traveler – craft cocktails at the Evening Bar to a strong cup of brew for the morning after. Namaste your preferred mode of R&R? Check out Citizen Yoga right around the corner for early sunrise salutations.

We were pleasantly surprised to find Detroit’s dining scene equally fulfilling. When inquiring with the locals in our pre-departure planning, out rolled a list a mile-long, from Bon Appetit award-winners to James Beard nominees. Headed to Marrow? The namesake dish is such for a reason. Sweets + treats more your thing? The almond croissant at Ochre might as well be Parisian. From pasta to patty melt, we most certainly did not leave hungry. Same could be said of creative inspiration. Also on Woodward (did we mention it’s one of America’s most iconic streets, not to mention the first to be paved in 1909, aptly fitting for the Motor City) is the Detroit Institute of Arts. For those who gravitate towards a traditional art setting, the DIA definitely won’t disappoint. For us, the creative scene-stealer is actually located in the picturesque Detroit suburb of Bloomfield Hills. Cranbrook Art Musuem, a National Historic Landmark, is home not only to a collection of 6,000+ works, but also a Frank Lloyd Wright home and Saarinen House. Going to be in the area before December 1st? Be sure to book a tour of the Studio Loja Saarinen collection of textiles on exhibit within the house she inhabited with her husband.

From past to present, mass production to craft purveyors, we’re excited to see what lies on the proverbial road ahead for the Motor City.

 

WARP & WEFT | ALEXANDRA KOHL

February 22, 2019

It was a few years ago at Field & Supply that we first came across the work of New York-based Fiber Artist Alexandra Kohl. Kohl, an avid equestrian, combines the beauty of cotton with horsehair via a delicate dance of warp and weft. The result – hand-woven textiles which not only unite the natural qualities of plant and animal, but also emanate an intricacy that discreetly draws the viewer in for closer admiration. For anyone unfamiliar with the age-old craft of hand-weaving, it is a process equally laborious and tranquil; each individual yarn manipulated by the weaver in a deliberate act as intricate as those of an experienced surgeon. Kohl’s masterful hand and eye for color marry flawlessly to preserve the longstanding tradition of hand-weaving.

In her most recent body of work, a joint venture with furniture designer J.M. Szymanski, bespoke furnishings juxtapose Kohl’s soft substrates against the stature of cast iron. Named an emerging talent by Architectural Digest in 2017, Kohl’s admiration for minimalism and organic architecture lends inspiration and is distinctly embodied in her textiles. What makes Kohl’s work even more desirable? A unique versatility to complement a wide range of aesthetic preferences, modern to traditional.

Images courtesy of Alexandra Kohl.

MIDCOAST MAINE

October 16, 2017

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There’s a reason they call Maine Vacationland. No matter the length of your stay or coordinates on the map, this postcard-perfect state grabs hold of your psyche whilst everything else melts away. Truth be told, we’ve been going to Maine for years, and easily a tradition we’ll continue for a lifetime more. An earlier Gilded Getaway found us in Portland, which in the short time since 2014 has exploded with such intensity that our travel compass is vehemently guiding us back for Getaway Guide v2.0. However, this trip had us craving a little more water, a little less land – we ventured farther up the rocky terrain, to an area the locals refer to as MidCoast.

Dotted with tiny coastal villages, each chock full of charm and character, the MidCoast region offers ocean vistas set against a backdrop of majestic mountains. Undoubtedly, one of the many reasons some of America’s most notable painters flocked to the region to capture the remarkable landscape for the rest of the world to see. Our admiration lies with time spent off the land, sailing along the coast past island after island, colorful lobster buoys as far as the eye can see. The natives are a hearty group, New Englanders through and through, some more salty than others, all eager to welcome visitors to their small slice of Vacationland heaven. Take Camden’s Schooner Surprise for example, setting sail in Penobscot Bay six months of the year, up to five sails per day. A crisp autumn breeze won’t cause this 99-year-old vessel to drop anchor, simply layer on the blankets, pack on the puffers and away you go.

Back on solid ground and as one would expect, the local fare epitomizes the freshest catch. Naturally, there’s seafood and lobsters galore, but what’s more exciting to a discerning palate is the new roster of restaurants that beautifully balance the bounty of land and sea. Nina June, recently lauded by Bon Appetit as one of 2017’s best new restaurants and of famed NYC restaurant lineage by way of Chef Sara Jenkins, does exactly that, all while overlooking a storybook setting below. Looking for a light lunch bite or packing for a picnic? Head to Main St. Markets in Rockland, pick up a handful of provisions and drive south to Owls Head State Park.

In these parts, we highly recommend a daily dose of Vitamin Sea, good for the soul and whatever else ails you.

MOODY BLUES | LIZ ROBB

June 18, 2015

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If ever one could have a love affair with color, indigo would be our soul mate and Liz Robb, matchmaker extraordinaire. Interiors at the Gilded Getaway House have taken a keen liking (okay, more like a blatant schoolgirl crush) to the moody blue hue, and when we stumbled upon the work of this California based fiber artist, we immediately added another line item to our decorating wishlist. To the eye of a textile designer, the technical structure of Liz’s work is beautifully simple + mindfully understated, elevated by her preference for natural fibers, which serve as the perfect canvas to highlight the hand-dyed techniques that envelop many of her pieces.

A visual journey through Liz’s portfolio is easily equated to a leisurely stroll down the proverbial path of textile paradise. From where we stand, the only downfall with so much eye-candy? Selecting a favorite and speed dialing a commission, because surely, every prized piece by Sally England needs a pretty drop-dead gorgeous partner-in-crime. Summerset is, after all, only in her second season, and like any fresh, young starlet en route to making her golden debut, the layers of her wardrobe are just beginning.

Images courtesy of Liz Robb.

Our love affair with all things paper started as a wee petite, and given its unwavering fortitude well into adulthood, one might go so far as to say it’s in our blood. Our grandfather worked for one of countless paper mills that hugged the waterways of western Mass., which in its heyday, was coined the ‘paper capital of the world’. Fast forward two generations and our own playroom shelves were stocked with misprinted steno pads, overruns of colored sheets and reams of paper to our heart’s content. The budding creative had found her treasure.

When the time arose for more serious contemplation on the subject of school supplies, the quest for the perfect sheet of loose leaf equated to an educational Mt. Everest. While some will question the mindfulness of such, others will fall in flashback step as we reminisce, (yes, we know you’re out there). College-ruled, naturally, as wide-ruled was for those who had not yet tamed their flailing penmanship. Lines a soft shade of turquoise, printed crisp and light, 1 pt max should we dare to get technical. The left hand guide, a muted red dancing between Nantucket and Salmon on the Pantone spectrum. All in all, the perfect real estate for young prose and the proverbial checklist. Sadly, Mead, an old-school staple stocked in abundance come late-July, failed to deliver with blotchy printing and mis-matched hues. Instead, we headed to the illustrious bookstore of our hometown prep school, where the education was not only top-notch and befitting of future presidents, politicians and the nation’s elite, but the office assortment was crême-de-la-crême in paper perfection.

Enter Allison Freeman, an MFA Yale-graduate and creative catalyst capable of bringing any paper hound straight to her knees with this unique collection. The artists’ “Document” series, exhibited in 2010 at the Angell Gallery in Toronto, takes oil to canvas in her rendition of bureaucratic form through the simplistic lifecycle of receipts, to-do lists and bill of sales. Unfortunately, Ms. Freeman’s personal site appears to be no more, and with a minute crumb trail left to gather the details, we’re craving a taste of more. Disappointment aside, we’re madly in love with these unique pieces, almost in scale to the papers they reference, yet wildy large in personality.

Allison Freeman Document-7Allison Freeman Document-8

Allison Freeman Document-1

Allison Freeman

Images Courtesy of Angell Gallery and The Jealous Curator.

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