Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

DETROIT

November 9, 2019

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We know, we promised 2019 would be a pointed return to better blogging. If you’re here as a loyal reader, fingers crossed you’ve already forgiven us. Ended up here on a whim? We’re so glad you found us. With a trip to Michigan already on the books, we declared it perfect timing to tack on a few days in the Motor City and faithfully return to our Gilded Getaway roots. Having been to the city in recent years for a special project, one might say we were pre-exposed; we had a heightened sense of what to anticipate and where to explore. It’s true what the papers say, Detroit is a city in transition, i.e. ‘under construction’ – the sights and sounds of revitalization and a return to glory on the horizon, but very much a work-in-progress. Thanks in part to an alliance of local developers and larger corporations, downtown has successfully seen the restoration of landmark buildings, complemented by cutting-edge cuisine, American-made manufacturing and good ‘ole red, white & blue homegrown spirit.

While a stay at the new Shinola Hotel was truly the catalyst of our travel journey, the guide is chock full of good eats mixed with a splash of inspiration. Recently named Best New Large Hotel by Surface Magazine, the 1400 Woodward hotel designed by Gachot Studios is simply stunning, worthy of every accolade already received and all the future news that’s fit to print. The site is storied with Motor City history, an amalgamation of five historic buildings and a tucked away alley paying homage to one of the city’s first black landowners. For those looking to stay local, the Detroit-based Shinola team provided everything at arm’s length for the discerning traveler – craft cocktails at the Evening Bar to a strong cup of brew for the morning after. Namaste your preferred mode of R&R? Check out Citizen Yoga right around the corner for early sunrise salutations.

We were pleasantly surprised to find Detroit’s dining scene equally fulfilling. When inquiring with the locals in our pre-departure planning, out rolled a list a mile-long, from Bon Appetit award-winners to James Beard nominees. Headed to Marrow? The namesake dish is such for a reason. Sweets + treats more your thing? The almond croissant at Ochre might as well be Parisian. From pasta to patty melt, we most certainly did not leave hungry. Same could be said of creative inspiration. Also on Woodward (did we mention it’s one of America’s most iconic streets, not to mention the first to be paved in 1909, aptly fitting for the Motor City) is the Detroit Institute of Arts. For those who gravitate towards a traditional art setting, the DIA definitely won’t disappoint. For us, the creative scene-stealer is actually located in the picturesque Detroit suburb of Bloomfield Hills. Cranbrook Art Musuem, a National Historic Landmark, is home not only to a collection of 6,000+ works, but also a Frank Lloyd Wright home and Saarinen House. Going to be in the area before December 1st? Be sure to book a tour of the Studio Loja Saarinen collection of textiles on exhibit within the house she inhabited with her husband.

From past to present, mass production to craft purveyors, we’re excited to see what lies on the proverbial road ahead for the Motor City.

 

With a fresh blanket of snow covering New England, there couldn’t be a better time to dream about everyone’s favorite warm weather treat, ice cream. Or, from the perspective of Victoria Young, as told to Edible Rhody, “Only in New England could you sell ice cream in the winter.” One might say Young, part of a rapidly growing movement of culinary purveyors taking the Rhode Island capital by storm, knows her way around a commercial kitchen. With a heavy-hitting resume, including time spent in the company of some of the world’s most renowned chefs (Redzepi, Boulud, need we say more?), Young has her sight set on elevating the profile of the creamy indulgence, one unique flavor at a time.

Scooping since Summer 2018, Fountain & Co., (Providence’s first craft ice cream maker), fully embraces the bounty of the Ocean State. A Johnson & Wales pastry alum, Young is drawn to the local RI community of growers and makers, using only the freshest ingredients in designing her flavors. And because ice cream is always more fun when there’s a party, Young has partnered with fellow Providence purveyors for a hitlist of brand collaborations (‘mashups’ for those of a more youthful generation). Need a little pep in your summer step? Cue Bourbon Butterscotch Coffee Stout, a flavor intense with Nitro Cart’s amazing brew. Ice cream sandwiches more your thing? Insert a PVDonut hugging your creamy scoop. Sundaes? Young’s got those too. Burgundian Liège Waffles are the perfect host for any combo of ice cream and toppings.

Craving a scoop to call your own? Young is currently popping up all over Providence, most frequently filling cups and cones out of a small window in partnership with Stock Culinary Goods. If the winter weather has you down, Young’s Pint of the Month is a no-brainer. Limited edition flavors in pint-sized containers, for all you late-night sneaky spooners.

Images courtesy of Fountain & Co. 

TICKET TO DELICIOUS | THE GREY

December 30, 2017

 

As the end of 2017 draws near, we find it only fitting to close the year with a feast for the eyes and the belly. It’s been a wholesome year at TGL, abundant with travel to cities at home and countries abroad, memorable meal after memorable meal, and a healthy dose of Vitamin Sea thanks to repose-on-repeat in our City-by-the-Sea.

During our last #gildedgetaway of 2017, (a pre-holiday escape to Savannah), we marched our hungry selves straight to The Grey, a hub, not only for bustling waitstaff serving plates of Southern hospitality, but also a symbol for an era reincarnate. The Grey is brain-child of Savannah-ite by way of New York John Morisano, whose vision for a 1938 Greyhound Bus Terminal broke all boundaries when it transcended expectations of experiential modern day dining. Gastronomically paired with the talent of Chef Mashama Bailey, Morisano unequivocally describes the concept for The Grey as, “Delicious“.

The partners looked to NYC-based Parts and Labor Design to assume the monumental task of breathing new life into the old terminal on one of the Port City’s main arteries, a project which earned them James Beard accolades for Restaurant Design in 2015. Preserving as many original details from the terminal as possible, Parts and Labor seamlessly transport diners back to 1938 via a contemporary lens – the once ticket window now a voyeuristic view into Bailey’s open kitchen, the second-floor shower room a private dining retreat, the street front diner a casual bar with a daytime-esque menu. The shining star still twinkling in our eyes? Lighting. You read that right, lighting, every way you turn. Custom lighting so fitting to the era when we asked Morisano during our evening meal which pieces were original, we learned only several industrial pendants suspended high into the skylight, and our hands-down favorite, a petite brass and glass flush-mount en route to the first floor loo, were once seen by riders destined to other locations.

Last, but certainly not least, what restaurant in today’s world of discerning diners doesn’t deserve a top-notch identity, menu suite and collectible matches at the host stand? Cue LMNOP Creative, marrying Art Deco inspiration with sophisticated signage, illustration and typography to create ephemera worthy of more time in the limelight. Credit worthy paper goods are some of our favorite souvenirs, this visit replete with postcards, coasters, and naturally, one or two of the aforementioned matchbooks.

In the spirit of holiday giving, there’s more; we went back to The Grey less than 24 hours after our first meal, drawn to the small-but-mighty diner bar with windows as wide as they are tall (think Hopper in Savannah), yielding a one-way ticket to a different menu with classics like Pastrami on Rye or the Schnitzel Sandwich. Hence, if frequency to an establishment elicits further coaxing, we reckon you buy yourself a seat at this new/old Savannah landmark and partake of said ‘Deliciousness‘.

Images courtesy of Parts and Labor Design and LMNOP Creative.

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MIDCOAST MAINE

October 16, 2017

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There’s a reason they call Maine Vacationland. No matter the length of your stay or coordinates on the map, this postcard-perfect state grabs hold of your psyche whilst everything else melts away. Truth be told, we’ve been going to Maine for years, and easily a tradition we’ll continue for a lifetime more. An earlier Gilded Getaway found us in Portland, which in the short time since 2014 has exploded with such intensity that our travel compass is vehemently guiding us back for Getaway Guide v2.0. However, this trip had us craving a little more water, a little less land – we ventured farther up the rocky terrain, to an area the locals refer to as MidCoast.

Dotted with tiny coastal villages, each chock full of charm and character, the MidCoast region offers ocean vistas set against a backdrop of majestic mountains. Undoubtedly, one of the many reasons some of America’s most notable painters flocked to the region to capture the remarkable landscape for the rest of the world to see. Our admiration lies with time spent off the land, sailing along the coast past island after island, colorful lobster buoys as far as the eye can see. The natives are a hearty group, New Englanders through and through, some more salty than others, all eager to welcome visitors to their small slice of Vacationland heaven. Take Camden’s Schooner Surprise for example, setting sail in Penobscot Bay six months of the year, up to five sails per day. A crisp autumn breeze won’t cause this 99-year-old vessel to drop anchor, simply layer on the blankets, pack on the puffers and away you go.

Back on solid ground and as one would expect, the local fare epitomizes the freshest catch. Naturally, there’s seafood and lobsters galore, but what’s more exciting to a discerning palate is the new roster of restaurants that beautifully balance the bounty of land and sea. Nina June, recently lauded by Bon Appetit as one of 2017’s best new restaurants and of famed NYC restaurant lineage by way of Chef Sara Jenkins, does exactly that, all while overlooking a storybook setting below. Looking for a light lunch bite or packing for a picnic? Head to Main St. Markets in Rockland, pick up a handful of provisions and drive south to Owls Head State Park.

In these parts, we highly recommend a daily dose of Vitamin Sea, good for the soul and whatever else ails you.

If you’ve been following along on our recent travels, we declared an unabashed love affair with a certain New Orleans eatery. From the dream team that brought us Grand Banks, (i.e., a floating slice of heaven on the Hudson,) Seaworthy sits on equally hallowed ground. Brothers (and New Orleans natives) Miles and Alex Pincus, along with Adrien Gallo and Kerry Heffernan (all of Grand Banks lineage), partnered with famed Ace Hotel group to craft a new seafood destination in a town that knows a thing or two about the local catch.

Nestled in a historic, Creole townhouse, the NY-based interiors team at Home Studios reimagined a space that feels far from old salt and more maritime meets the mainland. Leather banquettes in blues as rich as the deepest ocean waters invite guests to lust over towering trays of the freshest catch and linger over craft-made cocktails. Rough wood floors with a perfect creak, wax-drenched tapers on many a mantle, and patinated walls that showcase tales of the sea via antique photos and paintings. On the third floor, an intimate dining room for private parties and social soirées. Truth be told, we’ve been drafting a list of excuses reasons we need to venture back to throw a seafaring shindig in this cozy cottage-like space.

It goes without saying, oysters are the trophy-piece at this NOLA restaurant, with special attention to wild-caught and sustainably harvested varietals from coastlines across the country – Gulf, East and West. Under Heffernan’s culinary direction, the team also spotlights a diversified menu of coastal species, often using underutilized seafare to support more sustainable fisheries. When it comes to ‘the Roll’, we’ll admit, we’re slightly biased. However, Seaworthy’s Gulf Coast Roll, a combination of gulf shrimp, blue crab, lemon and cucumber, gives our Northeast staple a solid run for the money.

On a long-weekend Gilded Getaway in the Big Easy, we dare to admit, we followed our sails to this chic ‘lil spot on more than one occasion. When time is tight, a double dip is sure sign of a worthy find.

Menu Musts

Cocktail | Sherman’s Cup

Assorted Oysters | At least a dozen (okay, maybe two)

Small Plates | Blue Crab + Fried Oysters, the Pork Belly too!

Large Plates | Gulf Coast Roll + Red Snapper

Sides | Hijiki-seasoned French Fries

Dessert | Espresso Crème Brûlée (Served with a side of beignets, why thank you.)

 

Seaworthy | 630 Carondelet Street | New Orleans, LA 70130

Images courtesy of Seaworthy and Roland Bello.

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