Archive for the ‘Lifestyle’ Category

 

It’s 2021, and like many things to look forward to this week, the construction scene at Summerset has decidedly departed 2020 waving au revoir to caution tape and saying hello new chapter. Our crew is making significant progress, spaces are taking form and soon, visions transition to reality.  Next to debut in ‘A Summerset Story’, the most private of spaces, the primary bath.

Full transparency folks, no rhyme or reason to the sequence in which rooms are being shared, in similar approach to navigating life these days, let’s just roll with it, shall we? The 2nd floor (aka primary) bath – a room that will embody by far the greatest transformation from where it all started. (Lest you forget and need a walk down pre-reno memory lane, drop in here for a refresh of what the space looked like before – cramped, not the least bit cozy, all accentuated by that cringe-worthy infamous platform.)

Our expansion yielded considerably more space to allocate accordingly and yet, I’ve been dead set on the design of the bath be respectful to the remainder of the house, both in scale and sentiment. Original layout drawn up by the architect took a turn early on after a walk-through with our plumber, who quickly identified challenges given the age of the house, particularly pitch relative to location of key drainage points and a desire to minimize construction to other non-reno areas of the home. In creative collaboration, we re-dealt a winning deck for ourselves and have since been on a path to primary bath perfection.

I welcome you to check out some of my inspiration saved here and in the words of friend, mentor and purveyor of the perfect bath – Barbara Sallick, create an experience that’s meaningful for you.

Inspiration Sources: 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08

 

Introducing A Summerset Story’, a promised walk-through of the innermost design details going into our quaint cottage in the City-by-the-Sea. I’m not here to bore you with before-and-after photos, how-to’s or a laundry list of sources. Rather, consider this your golden ticket to 100% unadulterated inspiration. Drawing from the Newport tours that showcase our neighboring Bellevue beauties, an intimate look at my creative vision for the 1940-home (albeit on a much less grandiose scale and without those awful, pre-COVID communal headsets).

We start with what I’ve nicknamed ‘The Green Room’, a small open area directly off an even smaller (code word for tiny) entry – blessed with a cathedral ceiling, amazing afternoon light and a mood I fancy one part bucolic/one part botanical. My perception of palette isn’t one reserved for color, but an enlightened mix of paint, pattern, textiles and more. Those gosh-darn delectable details I’m forever championing? They’re here too, because like a great cocktail party (remember those?), the more the merrier.

If you’re captivated by the images I’ve included here, I’ve saved them all, along with a few extra servings, on a new story board. Feel free to beg, borrow and steal pin them to your own, or simply follow along, I fully embrace that approach too. Check out some of my other boards while you’re there, I’d love to have you.

Inspiration sources: 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08

SUMMERSET SERIES | NO. 5

December 2, 2020

It’s been just shy of four months since our last Summerset Series post, to say we’ve come a long way would be an understatement. Our crew demo’d more than 50% of the cottage, peeled cut the roof off like a tin of sardines and in very Humpty-Dumptyish style, have spent every day since lovingly putting it all back together again. If you’ve been following along, you’ll know there’s a layer of humor woven into it all, because if one can’t find laughter in the wee hours while frantically taping holes in a giant tarp overhead at the mercy of a Nor’easter, what’s left but tears and a well-appointed bar cart?

Thankfully, we’ve rounded the corner on major construction – exterior framing complete, new roof installed, plumbing + electrical being layered in. And while there are still several more weeks to go, signs point toward project completion in early 2021. Attention has diverted from late night layout edits to full court press on the delectable details. Over a quiet holiday at home, I listened to the Calico Club’s conversation with British interior designer Nicola Harding – a lovely reminder why I so emphatically wanted to execute on the interiors of Summerset personally. Nicola opened the dialogue with a question, “What makes you happy?” as her lead-in to the evening’s theme, ‘How to make a house a home.’ In her words, “It is a place that fits you perfectly. It reminds you of who you are and it makes it easy to be the you that you want to be.” 

Over the coming weeks I’ll be sharing snippets of the inspiration that’s got me wide-eyed and awake at night, day-dreaming about paint palettes bolder than I’ve ever dared implement before (yet secretly pin like a color hoarder), layering with textiles, furnishings and a dash of frivolity. Aligned with our TGL motto, I strive to serve the freshest catch of inspiration, occasionally golden, always deliciously creative. Be sure to join me here + here, and while my inspiration will be as Nicola referenced, perfectly suited to me, I sincerely hope via my journey, you’ll find the recipe to design your own house into the home that’s, as a wise Dr. Seuss would say, ‘youer than you’.

 

If you’ve been following along, you likely know we’re in the early stages of renovation at Summerset. While not colonial like many homes in Newport, a 1940s-cottage does come with its own set of construction challenges in the age of modern zoning + occupancy approvals. We’re leaving the heavy lifting of marrying floor joists and reinforcing rooflines to our dream team of architects, engineers + contractors so we can focus almost exclusively on the interiors.

As with any design project, options are endless (while for many of us, budgets are not) and the project can feel overwhelmingly daunting. When setting out, there were two things I was determined to write into the next chapter of our coastal home – maintaining its charming character and making it feel unequivocally me (don’t worry, the Captain’s input is usually always incorporated). Since the early years of penning posts here at Around the Pound, I’ve openly shared a love + admiration for textiles. The Part Deux of our double feature this month is dedicated to a new textile studio out of Charleston, whose gorgeous fabrics will undoubtedly be designed into the delectable details I have planned for Summerset.

Palmette, founded by Chris and Elizabeth Boyette, is rooted in the brand’s aesthetic, ‘Classical and timeless with the breezy and relaxed air of the coast‘. Similar in sentiment to our TGL tagline, ‘Classic Style with a Pinch of Glam‘, I had a strong intuition upon their launch that I was going to adore anything (or better yet, everything) the couple created. A small collection of textiles (and just launched pillows!), each available in several colorways, sparks the perfect balance between sophisticated and sweet. Printed on 100% Belgian linen (with options in weight depending on your project and product application), Elizabeth’s eye for color is spot-on – subtle synchrony for the Henrietta Tonal, or a versatile range of colors on ivory for the Sullivan Stripe. Personally, Henrietta for bespoke shades to dress up tiny wall sconces is sitting at the top of my wishlist, with the million dollar dilemma – True Blue, Indigo or Mulberry?

The design duo behind Palmette’s sister studio Good South created their own identity for the brand. A simple type treatment, equally as beautiful as the textiles, sets the stage for the pretty patterns. And because I love paper equally to prints, when a lush letterpress business card arrived tucked in with my memos, I immediately reached out to Elizabeth to share how stunning everything is. Looking for interior inspiration or a slice of Charleston charm? Follow along on their instagram, you’re sure to find yourself scouring antique shoppes for a settee in need of something extra special. I can’t wait to see where Palmette ventures next, while not textiles, I’m secretly hoping wall coverings are in the forecast. A certain cottage is chock full of nooks and crannies that would be drop dead adorable with a pop of Palmette pattern.

Images courtesy of Palmette.

SUMMERSET SERIES | NO. 4

August 7, 2020

 

‘The value of time’, cliche yes, and yet, so undeniably true. The past several months, respectfully void of gilded getaways, world travel and general day-to-day distractions given the state of international affairs, have afforded us the luxury of time. Time to slow down, time to focus on the things that feed us creatively and and time to enjoy the bounty granted to us by a life near the sea (our hydrangea cup runneth 10x over this season).

With demolition scheduled to commence imminently at Summerset, it’s been pencil-to-paper in an all out effort to define/refine the necessary details for our upcoming renovation. While we worked with Cordtsen Design Architecture on all structural elements of the project, the interiors were a scope of work I felt confident to navigate. Full transparency folks – I am not an interior designer by trade, but know my way around a drafting table, have 15+ years experience in the field of design, and can manage a project from concept to execution well enough to know I wasn’t biting off more than I could chew. (Not to mention, we have an amazing GC who ‘gets me’ and my penchant for perfection.)  That said, I also know things almost never go according to plan, schedules run delayed and running a tight ship when it comes to balancing budget and beauty is nonnegotiable for a successful outcome.

In celebration of breaking ground (i.e. dumpster delivery + excavation), follow along at #tglsummersetseries and dive into the ‘avant’ highlights in our insta-stories for a sneak peek at the ‘before’. I promise, not a one-eye open sort of scary.

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